Medical

Reason behind high-intensity statins market (atorvastatin, rosuvastatin) decline likely found

high-intensity statins

A new study has revealed that a substantial proportion of patients prescribed high-intensity statins after they suffer heart attack are not sticking with the medication with high adherence at two years after discharge. This could be one of the reasons why the high-intensity statins market may be witnessing minute decline bumps over time.

According to a study published by JAMA Cardiology, at six months and two years after discharge, 59 per cent and 42 per cent of the participants were taking high-intensity statins with high adherence (a proportion of days covered of at least 80 percent), 8.7 percent and 13 percent down-titrated (switching to a low/moderate-intensity statin with a proportion of days covered of at least 80 percent), 17 percent and 19 percent had low adherence (a proportion of days covered less than 80 percent for any statin intensity without discontinuation), 12 percent and 19 percent discontinued their statin, respectively (not having a statin available to take in the last 60 days of each follow-up period).

The proportion taking high-intensity statins with high adherence increased between 2007 and 2012. African American and Hispanic patients and new high-intensity statin users were less likely to take high-intensity statins with high adherence, and those with dual Medicare/Medicaid coverage and more cardiologist visits after discharge and who participated in cardiac rehabilitation were more likely to take high-intensity statins with high adherence. Results were similar among beneficiaries older than 75 years of age.

High-intensity statins are recommended following myocardial infarction (MI; heart attack). Robert S. Rosenson, M.D., of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, and colleagues conducted a study that included Medicare beneficiaries ages 66 to 75 years (n = 29,932) and older than 75 years (n = 27,956) hospitalized for MI between 2007 and 2012 who filled a high-intensity statin prescription (atorvastatin, 40-80 mg, and rosuvastatin, 20-40 mg) within 30 days of discharge. Beneficiaries had Medicare fee-for-service coverage including pharmacy benefits.

About the author

Anthony Clarke

Anthony holds a masters in Journalism and has been an avid creative writer since his teens. Anthony has got his work featured in a number of publications including Dig Boston, Scout Somerville, Content Standard, STACK, and Spare Change News. As a journalist he has been known for his work on homelessness, local politics, transportation, Latino and immigration issues, and music. As a blogger and press writer, he has worked on topics like religion, local business, video games, social media, and higher education. He was a prizewinner in the Eighth Annual Kingston-Mann Student Research Awards and received his MFA in Creative Non-Fiction from Pine Manor College’s Solstice Creative Writing Program. While he still enjoys researching and writing articles, he enjoys working with a team of writers even more.

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